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22.794 Keywords • 48.339 Synonyms • 5.299 Translations • 7.909 Pronunciations • 151.949 Cross-references

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aosta Valley

Valle d’Aosta (I)
Vallée d’Aoste (F)
Vale de Aosta (PO)
Aosta Valley (GB)
Valle de Aosta (ES)

The far least Italian region with just under 500 hectares of vineyards is on the border France and the Switzerland, The area is horseshoe-shaped surrounded by the Valais and Cottian Alps. Viticulture was operated long before the turn of the century by the indigenous people of Salassi. In the year 25 BC BC, the Romans founded the fortress "Augusta Prätoria" (today's capital Aosta) and controlled from here the Alpine passes over the little ones and Great St. Bernard. They also brought their wine culture with them. After the Romans came the Benedictine and Cistercian and drove in painstaking work the terraces in the rocky slopes. Mid-20th century, the highest vineyards were abandoned, which was prevented by initiative of the Abbé Alexandre Bougeat (1916-1972). From the 9th century, the Aosta Valley was repeatedly under French influence as part of the two former kingdoms Burgundy and Savoy, From this time comes the still existing bilingualism, which also appears on the bottle labels of the wines.

The vineyards amounted to the end of the 19th century still 3,000 hectares, which reduced to one sixth today. The vineyards stretch 90 kilometers along the Dora Baltea river valley to the Piedmont, They are located in up to 1,200 meters above sea level and are thus among the highest of the world. With the neighboring Italian Swiss Wallis becomes a geographical island with many old, autochthonous Grapes formed (see a list below Old plants ). As a special feature, 99% of the production is DOC quality.

Under the name Valle d'Aosta (Vallée d'Aoste), there is a single DOC area covering the entire region with around 40 municipalities and over 4,000 winegrowers. In this numerous types of wine from over 20 grape varieties are allowed. There are six sub-zones that are considered to be separate DOCs, these are Arnad-Montjovet , Blanc de Morgex et de la Salle, Donnas , Enfer d'Arvier , Nus and Torrette . These are alone (eg Valle d'Aosta Nus), in addition to the grape variety (eg Valle d'Aosta Nus Malvoisie / Pinot Grigio) or color (for example Valle d'Aosta Nus Rosso) on label and then represent a specific type of wine according to DOC specifications.

The wine types Bianco / Blanc , Rosso / Rouge and Rosato / Rosé may be pressed in any mixture of the approved red and white varieties. The varietal wines must contain at least 85% of the variety concerned, the rest of 15% may be other authorized varieties. The white wines are Chardonnay, Moscato Bianco or Muscat Petit Grain ( Muscat Blanc ), Moscato Bianco Passito or Muscat Petit Grain Flétri. Müller-Thurgau, Petite Arvine ( Arvine ), Pinot Bianco or Pinot Blanc, Pinot Grigio or Pinot Gris, Traminer Aromatico or Gewurztraminer and Traminer Aromatico Passito. The reds are Fumin. Gamaret. Gamay. Mayolet. Merlot. Nebbiolo. Petit Rouge, Pinot Nero or Pinot Noir, Prémetta ( Primetta ) and Syrah,

Some of these wines are also called alcoholic Superiore or as vendemmia tardiva or Vendange tardive (Late harvest) produced. If the grapes originate from classified vineyards, all of the wines listed above can be found on the bottle label Vigna followed by the layer name. There are none in the region IGT or IGP (the land wines) Classified wines or areas.

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