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The largest wine encyclopedia in the world

22.856 Keywords • 48.241 Synonyms • 5.299 Translations • 51.012 Pronunciations • 152.571 Cross-references

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Glass

glass (GB)
verre (F)
vetro (I)
vidro (PO)
vidrio (ES)

The oldest finds of artificially produced glass in the form of glass beads date back to around 3500 BC. From Egyptian royal tombs. Around 1500 BC Were in Egypt and in the area of Mesopotamia the first hollow glasses made and already wine glasses used. The glass was then heated to about 900 ° C, it was then in a viscous state and was wrapped around solid sand or clay cores and modeled. The fragility prevented the glass from permitting itself to be used for larger containers and thus for transport. Around 200 BC BC revolutionized the invention of the glassmaker's pipe (glassblowing) and the glass melting furnace by the Phoenicians in the area of today Syria the glass production fundamentally.

The Romans first produced window glass in the 1st century AD. They also already set bottles for wine, which were hardly used for storage because of their fragility. To this end, pottery vessels such as the amphorae, The oldest wine bottle The World of Content is exhibited in a museum in Speyer. It was found in a Roman tomb and dates back to the 4th century AD. Incidentally, the age of glass can be determined by ion beam analysis. This can be manipulations and wine adulteration when selling old and more expensive vintages be revealed. Related to this service is the London Wine Trade House Antique Wine Company on.

From the 14th century was in Venice produced luxury glass exported worldwide. Glass was an absolute luxury item and silver drinking glasses were considered ordinary. At that time, straw-wrapped bottles in Florence were already being used to transport wine, but glass was still too fragile. The majority continued to serve this purpose casks or containers made of other materials such as stoneware or tin. It was not until the beginning of the 17th century that it was possible to produce more resistant bottles in the UK due to the use of coal-fired ovens and thus high heat. Here, in 1675, the production of lead crystal was discovered. Now industrial bottles of various shapes and sizes have been produced. For the expansion and storage of wine today glass containers of 25 to 65 liters are used as an alternative to small wooden barrels. See also the topic under bottles. glass corks and wine vessels,

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